Bill Gates Shares his Favorite Books
Bill Gates is an American business magnate, philanthropist, investor, computer programmer, and inventor. Gates is the former chief executive and chairman of Microsoft, the world’s largest personal-computer software company.




[Source:The Gates Notes]

Business Adventures
" Warren Buffett recommended this book to me back in 1991, and it’s still the best business book I have ever read. "
This business classic written by longtime New Yorker contributor John Brooks is an insightful and engaging look into corporate and financial life in America. What do the $350 million Ford Motor Company disaster known as the Edsel, the fast and incredible rise of Xerox, and the unbelievable scandals at General Electric and Texas Gulf Sulphur have in common? Each is an example of how an iconic company was defined by a particular moment of fame or notoriety.
Stress Test
" The politics of fighting financial crises will always be ugly. But it helps if the public knows a little more about the subject what is at stake, what the options are, what has worked in similar situations so that the loud talkers resonate a bit less and the knowledgeable ones a bit more. If Stress Test continues to attract lay readers, it could make at least a modest difference the next time around. "
On January 26, 2009, during the depth of the financial crisis and having just completed five years as President of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, Timothy F. Geithner was sworn in by President Barack Obama as the seventy-fifth Secretary of the Treasury of the United States. Now, in a strikingly candid, riveting, and historically illuminating memoir, Geithner takes readers behind the scenes during the darkest moments of the crisis. Swift, decisive, and creative action was required to avert a second Great Depression, but policy makers faced a fog of uncertainty, with no good options and the risk of catastrophic outcomes.
The Bully Pulpit: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism
" I'm especially interested in the central question that Goodwin raises: How does social change happen? I loved Goodwin's Team of Rivals and highly recommend this one. "
Doris Kearns Goodwin, winner of the Pulitzer Prize and author of Team of Rivals, captures the Progressive Era through the story of the broken friendship between Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft, culminating in their running against one another for president in 1912.
The Rosie Project: A Novel
" It is a funny and profound book about being comfortable with who you are and what you are good at. It is one of the most enjoyable novels I've read in a long time. "
An international sensation, this hilarious, feel-good novel is narrated by an oddly charming and socially challenged genetics professor on an unusual quest: to find out if he is capable of true love.
The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History
" Unlike a lot of people who write about the environment, Kolbert doesn't resort to hype. She just lays out the facts and wraps them in memorable anecdotes. It's a sobering but engaging and informative read. "
A major book about the future of the world, blending intellectual and natural history and field reporting into a powerful account of the mass extinction unfolding before our eyes. Over the last half a billion years, there have been five mass extinctions, when the diversity of life on earth suddenly and dramatically contracted. Scientists around the world are currently monitoring the sixth extinction, predicted to be the most devastating extinction event since the asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs. This time around, the cataclysm is us.
Reinventing American Health Care
" The facts and history that Emanuel lays out would be useful to anyone involved in the debate over health care, no matter what their point of view is. "
Ezekiel J. Emanuel, a professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania who also served as a special adviser to the White House on health care reform, has written a brilliant diagnostic explanation of why health care in America has become such a divisive social issue, how money and medicine have their own quite distinct American story, and why reform has bedeviled presidents of the left and right for more than one hundred years.